BROWSE THIS EXHIBITION
1
-PAIR OF BOHEMIAN CUT GLASS VASES
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  • PAIR OF BOHEMIAN CUT GLASS VASES
  • Bohemia, Czech Republic, Early 20th Century
    a) 14 in (35.3 cm) high
    10.25 in ...
  • The history of glass in Bohemia dates back to the 13th century, but it wasn't until the Art Nouveau movement when the trade and distribution of glassware spread across Europe and South America, that it was internationally recognised as an art form. "When used in reference to glass, "bohemian" is often used to describe 19th-century faceted and engraved, bright-colored beakers, bowls, goblets and vases, that were available throughout Europe, America, and many other parts of the world." (Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, "The Tradition of the Avant-Garde: Bohemian Glass, 1820-1935," Corning Museum of Glass, 5 October 2011, online)

    Tracing its origins to the present-day Czech Republic and Poland (Bohemia and Silesia), Bohemian glass art evolved from centuries of experimentation in glass-making. The 16th and 17th centuries saw different traditions of hand-cut and engraved glass styles develop, with craftsmen adapting techniques such as gem engraving on to the glass. Glass cutting methods in intaglio, where designs were inscribed into the surface, and high relief forms, acquired sophistication. In the mid-19th century, glassmakers started using opaque and colourful marbled glass such as Marmoriertes and Lithyalin, making way for the Art Nouveau period Bohemian glass that is renowned today. Glass pieces during this period were often classic vases that shaped to take the form of seashells, flowers, and tree trunks.

    There are two kinds of Bohemian glass works in this exhibition. Lot 1 is the traditional, hand-cut decorative glass, and lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 are double overlay glass pieces.
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2
-BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS VASE
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  • BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS VASE
  • Bohemia, Czech Republic, 20th Century
    12 in (30.4 cm) high
    7.25 in (18.5 cm) ...
  • The history of glass in Bohemia dates back to the 13th century, but it wasn't until the Art Nouveau movement when the trade and distribution of glassware spread across Europe and South America, that it was internationally recognised as an art form. "When used in reference to glass, "bohemian" is often used to describe 19th-century faceted and engraved, bright-colored beakers, bowls, goblets and vases, that were available throughout Europe, America, and many other parts of the world." (Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, "The Tradition of the Avant-Garde: Bohemian Glass, 1820-1935," Corning Museum of Glass, 5 October 2011, online)

    Tracing its origins to the present-day Czech Republic and Poland (Bohemia and Silesia), Bohemian glass art evolved from centuries of experimentation in glass-making. The 16th and 17th centuries saw different traditions of hand-cut and engraved glass styles develop, with craftsmen adapting techniques such as gem engraving on to the glass. Glass cutting methods in intaglio, where designs were inscribed into the surface, and high relief forms, acquired sophistication. In the mid-19th century, glassmakers started using opaque and colourful marbled glass such as Marmoriertes and Lithyalin, making way for the Art Nouveau period Bohemian glass that is renowned today. Glass pieces during this period were often classic vases that shaped to take the form of seashells, flowers, and tree trunks.

    There are two kinds of Bohemian glass works in this exhibition. Lot 1 is the traditional, hand-cut decorative glass, and lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 are double overlay glass pieces.
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If you are interested in this piece, please contact exhibition@saffronart.com or delhi@saffronart.com




3
-BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS VASE
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  • BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS VASE
  • Bohemia, Czech Republic, 20th Century
    6.75 in (17.1 cm) high
    8.25 in (20.9...
  • A fine white over green double overlay glass vase with floral motifs.

    The history of glass in Bohemia dates back to the 13th century, but it wasn't until the Art Nouveau movement when the trade and distribution of glassware spread across Europe and South America, that it was internationally recognised as an art form."When used in reference to glass, "bohemian" is often used to describe 19th-century faceted and engraved, bright-colored beakers, bowls, goblets and vases,that were available throughout Europe, America, and many other parts of the world." (Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, "The Tradition of the Avant-Garde: Bohemian Glass, 1820-1935," Corning Museum of Glass, 5 October 2011, online)

    Tracing its origins to the present-day Czech Republic and Poland (Bohemia and Silesia), Bohemian glass art evolved from centuries of experimentation in glass-making.The 16th and 17th centuries saw different traditions of hand-cut and engraved glass styles develop, with craftsmen adapting techniques such as gem engraving on to the glass.Glass cutting methods in intaglio, where designs were inscribed into the surface, and high relief forms, acquired sophistication.In the mid-19th century, glassmakers started using opaque and colourful marbled glass such as Marmoriertes and Lithyalin, making way for the Art Nouveau period Bohemian glass that is renowned today.Glass pieces during this period were often classic vases that shaped to take the form of seashells, flowers, and tree trunks.

    There are two kinds of Bohemian glass works in this exhibition. Lot 1 is the traditional, hand-cut decorative glass, and lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 are double overlay glass pieces.
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If you are interested in this piece, please contact exhibition@saffronart.com or delhi@saffronart.com




4
-BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS VASE
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  • BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS VASE
  • Bohemia, Czech Republic, 20th Century
    12 in (30.7 cm) high
    9 in (23.1 cm)...
  • A fine white over red double overlay glass vase with floral motifs.

    The history of glass in Bohemia dates back to the 13th century, but it wasn't until the Art Nouveau movement when the trade and distribution of glassware spread across Europe and South America, that it was internationally recognised as an art form."When used in reference to glass, "bohemian" is often used to describe 19th-century faceted and engraved, bright-colored beakers, bowls, goblets and vases,that were available throughout Europe, America, and many other parts of the world." (Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, "The Tradition of the Avant-Garde: Bohemian Glass, 1820-1935," Corning Museum of Glass, 5 October 2011, online)

    Tracing its origins to the present-day Czech Republic and Poland (Bohemia and Silesia), Bohemian glass art evolved from centuries of experimentation in glass-making.The 16th and 17th centuries saw different traditions of hand-cut and engraved glass styles develop, with craftsmen adapting techniques such as gem engraving on to the glass.Glass cutting methods in intaglio, where designs were inscribed into the surface, and high relief forms, acquired sophistication.In the mid-19th century, glassmakers started using opaque and colourful marbled glass such as Marmoriertes and Lithyalin, making way for the Art Nouveau period Bohemian glass that is renowned today.Glass pieces during this period were often classic vases that shaped to take the form of seashells, flowers, and tree trunks.

    There are two kinds of Bohemian glass works in this exhibition. Lot 1 is the traditional, hand-cut decorative glass, and lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 are double overlay glass pieces.
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If you are interested in this piece, please contact exhibition@saffronart.com or delhi@saffronart.com




5
-BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS DECANTER
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  • BOHEMIAN DOUBLE OVERLAY GLASS DECANTER
  • Bohemia, Czech Republic, 20th Century
    16 in (40.5 cm) high
  • A fine white over red double overlay glass decanter with floral motifs.

    The history of glass in Bohemia dates back to the 13th century, but it wasn't until the Art Nouveau movement when the trade and distribution of glassware spread across Europe and South America, that it was internationally recognised as an art form."When used in reference to glass, "bohemian" is often used to describe 19th-century faceted and engraved, bright-colored beakers, bowls, goblets and vases,that were available throughout Europe, America, and many other parts of the world." (Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, "The Tradition of the Avant-Garde: Bohemian Glass, 1820-1935," Corning Museum of Glass, 5 October 2011, online)

    Tracing its origins to the present-day Czech Republic and Poland (Bohemia and Silesia), Bohemian glass art evolved from centuries of experimentation in glass-making.The 16th and 17th centuries saw different traditions of hand-cut and engraved glass styles develop, with craftsmen adapting techniques such as gem engraving on to the glass.Glass cutting methods in intaglio, where designs were inscribed into the surface, and high relief forms, acquired sophistication.In the mid-19th century, glassmakers started using opaque and colourful marbled glass such as Marmoriertes and Lithyalin, making way for the Art Nouveau period Bohemian glass that is renowned today.Glass pieces during this period were often classic vases that shaped to take the form of seashells, flowers, and tree trunks.

    There are two kinds of Bohemian glass works in this exhibition. Lot 1 is the traditional, hand-cut decorative glass, and lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 are double overlay glass pieces.
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If you are interested in this piece, please contact exhibition@saffronart.com or delhi@saffronart.com




6
-SILVER AND GLASS DECANTER BY SAMMY
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  • SILVER AND GLASS DECANTER BY SAMMY
  • Hong Kong, Circa 1930s
    Signed 'Sammy STERLING' (on the base)
    12 in (30.2 cm) ...
  • 0 x 0 in (0 x 0 cm)
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7
-SILVER ENAMELLED BOX
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  • SILVER ENAMELLED BOX
  • Height: 3 in (7.6 cm)
    Width: 6.25 (15.6 cm)
    Depth: 4 in (10.2 cm)
    Gross ...
  • 0 x 0 in (0 x 0 cm)
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8
-SILVER BOX WITH FLORAL MOTIFS
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  • SILVER BOX WITH FLORAL MOTIFS
  • Height: 2 in (5.2 cm)
    Width: 3.5 (9 cm)
    Depth: 2.75 in (6.8 cm)
    Gross...
  • 0 x 0 in (0 x 0 cm)
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9
-SILVER JEWELLERY BOX
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  • SILVER JEWELLERY BOX
  • Height: 4.5 in (11.7 cm)
    Width: 8.75 in (22.5 cm)
    Depth: 6.25 in (15.7 cm) ...
  • 0 x 0 in (0 x 0 cm)
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10
-SILVER BOX WITH RADHA-KRISHNA
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  • SILVER BOX WITH RADHA-KRISHNA
  • Height: 5 in (12.4 cm)
    Width: 13.5 in (34 cm)
    Depth: 6.25 in (15.8 cm)...
  • 0 x 0 in (0 x 0 cm)
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11
-PAIR OF CAMPANA SHAPED PORCELAIN VASES BY SÈVRES
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  • PAIR OF CAMPANA SHAPED PORCELAIN VASES BY SÈVRES
  • France, Early 20th Century
    Interlaced L's with an S mark
    15.75 in (40.1 cm)...
  • Sèvres porcelain, one of the most luxurious brands of ceramics, was a favourite among European royalty, aristocracy and collectors of the 19th and 20th centuries. Originally founded at Chateau de Vincennes, France, in 1738, it relocated to Sèvres in 1756 under the direction of Madame de Pompadour. It was the official porcelain manufacturer to the crown, and Louis XV, the king of France, became its sole owner three years later. Under his and Madame de Pompadour's patronage, it became the preeminent porcelain company in Europe in the second half of the 18th century.

    Over time, Sèvres produced both soft-paste and hard-paste porcelain, with exquisite designs and decorations. It also introduced the delicate "biscuit porcelain," a natural-toned, unglazed form of porcelain, often moulded as sculptures portraying scenes from classic mythologies or pastoral life. Sèvres was known for producing dinner sets and coffee and tea services, extravagant vases decorated with exotic flowers and birds on brilliantly coloured backgrounds, embellished with fine detail of curls, scrolls, and trellis patterns in gold.

    "The range of Sèvres creations is extensive, varying in shape, historical styles, motifs, and ornamentation. Vases typically feature double round, oval, or elliptical finely painted scenes edged in white, against pastel backgrounds. One side portrays figures, while the other features flower bouquets. Their lavish gilding, a royal touch reserved especially for Sèvres creations, is often embellished with engraved detail, like flowers or geometric motifs." ((Melody Amsel-Arieli, "How Sèvres survived the French Revolution and why it's so hard to avoid fakes and pastiches," Antique Trader, 10 August 2011, online) The company also developed unique colours such as the rose Pompadour, created by chemist Jean Hellot and characterised by its rose-pink ground colour, and bleu de roi, a cobalt-blue enamel.

    During the French Revolution (1789-1799), the company suffered financial setbacks and it was no longer a royal enterprise. With the appointment of Alexandre Brongniart (1770-1847) as its director in the beginning of the 19th century, and later Napolean Bonaparte, the industry revived. "Sèvres porcelain regained its former glory under Napoleon Bonaparte, who assumed power in 1804. He promoted elaborately ornamented pieces in the classical style. The Empire's richly decorated, themed dinner sets, for example, were enjoyed by distinguished guests, visiting rulers, and Napoleon himself. These pieces typically feature florals, landscapes, or cameo portraits, framed by solid gold edging accented with stylized palm fronds, the ancient Greek symbol of victory." (Amsel-Arieli, online)

    As of today, Sèvres produces both traditional and contemporary porcelain on commission, and continues to hold a prestigious place in the porcelain industry.
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12
-PAIR OF ORMOLU MOUNTED ROSE POMPADOUR PORCELAIN VASES WITH COVERS BY SÈVRES
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  • PAIR OF ORMOLU MOUNTED ROSE POMPADOUR PORCELAIN VASES WITH COVERS BY SÈVRES
  • France, 19th Century
    Interlaced L's with an S mark and dot underneath
    a)...
  • Sèvres porcelain, one of the most luxurious brands of ceramics, was a favourite among European royalty, aristocracy and collectors of the 19th and 20th centuries. Originally founded at Chateau de Vincennes, France, in 1738, it relocated to Sèvres in 1756 under the direction of Madame de Pompadour. It was the official porcelain manufacturer to the crown, and Louis XV, the king of France, became its sole owner three years later. Under his and Madame de Pompadour's patronage, it became the preeminent porcelain company in Europe in the second half of the 18th century.

    Over time, Sèvres produced both soft-paste and hard-paste porcelain, with exquisite designs and decorations. It also introduced the delicate "biscuit porcelain," a natural-toned, unglazed form of porcelain, often moulded as sculptures portraying scenes from classic mythologies or pastoral life. Sèvres was known for producing dinner sets and coffee and tea services, extravagant vases decorated with exotic flowers and birds on brilliantly coloured backgrounds, embellished with fine detail of curls, scrolls, and trellis patterns in gold.

    "The range of Sèvres creations is extensive, varying in shape, historical styles, motifs, and ornamentation. Vases typically feature double round, oval, or elliptical finely painted scenes edged in white, against pastel backgrounds. One side portrays figures, while the other features flower bouquets. Their lavish gilding, a royal touch reserved especially for Sèvres creations, is often embellished with engraved detail, like flowers or geometric motifs." ((Melody Amsel-Arieli, "How Sèvres survived the French Revolution and why it's so hard to avoid fakes and pastiches," Antique Trader, 10 August 2011, online) The company also developed unique colours such as the rose Pompadour, created by chemist Jean Hellot and characterised by its rose-pink ground colour, and bleu de roi, a cobalt-blue enamel.

    During the French Revolution (1789-1799), the company suffered financial setbacks and it was no longer a royal enterprise. With the appointment of Alexandre Brongniart (1770-1847) as its director in the beginning of the 19th century, and later Napolean Bonaparte, the industry revived. "Sèvres porcelain regained its former glory under Napoleon Bonaparte, who assumed power in 1804. He promoted elaborately ornamented pieces in the classical style. The Empire's richly decorated, themed dinner sets, for example, were enjoyed by distinguished guests, visiting rulers, and Napoleon himself. These pieces typically feature florals, landscapes, or cameo portraits, framed by solid gold edging accented with stylized palm fronds, the ancient Greek symbol of victory." (Amsel-Arieli, online)

    As of today, Sèvres produces both traditional and contemporary porcelain on commission, and continues to hold a prestigious place in the porcelain industry.
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13
-PAIR OF EMPIRE STYLE CANDELABRA
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  • PAIR OF EMPIRE STYLE CANDELABRA
  • France, 19th Century
    a) 21.75 in (55.3 cm) high
    b) 22 in (55.6 cm) high...
  • Pair of French Empire-style patented bronze candelabra, each featuring 5 scroll-and-acanthus-cast candle arms emanating from cornucopia, held aloft by classical male-and-female winged figures balancing atop bronze orbs. Each figure is supported on pedestals with applied, relief-cast cherub decoration and stepped bases.
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14
-PAIR OF CHARLES X ORMOLU AND BRONZE COLUMNAR CANDELABRA
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  • PAIR OF CHARLES X ORMOLU AND BRONZE COLUMNAR CANDELABRA
  • France, Circa 1825
    a) 27.75 in (70.7 cm) high
    b) 28 in (71 cm) high
    ...
  • Fine pair of Charles X cast and chased six-light fluted columnar candelabra chiselled with palmettos, foliage, and lotus leaves. Tripartite feet with claws on triangular bases.

    The reign of Charles X (1757-1836) is closely linked to the decorative style that carries his name. Furniture retained the heavy aspect it acquired during the Empire, yet forms became lighter and more supple following the Romantic trend and a renewed passion for the Gothic period.
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15
-CRYSTAL TRINKET BOX BY OSLER
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  • CRYSTAL TRINKET BOX BY OSLER
  • Height: 5.5 in (14 cm)
    Width: 9 in (22.6 cm)
    Depth: 5.75 in (14.7 cm)
  • 0 x 0 in (0 x 0 cm)
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16
-'JURANÇON LAVE-RAISINS' CRYSTAL VASE BY RENÉ LALIQUE
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  • 'JURANÇON LAVE-RAISINS' CRYSTAL VASE BY RENÉ LALIQUE
  • France, Designed by René Lalique, Circa 1938
    Signed 'R.LALIQUE' (on the base)...
  • "Glass is a marvellous material."- René Lalique, 1925

    Lalique is a French glassware design house founded by artist, master ceramist and jewellery designer René Lalique. One of the best-known designers of the Art Nouveau period, Lalique's glass designs often included dancing nymphs, fish, dragonflies, and foliage, typical of this period. His unique style played with the contrast between clear and frosted glass, sometimes embellished with a patina, enamel or stained glass.

    Before he started his own business in 1887, Lalique designed jewellery for prestigious houses such as Cartier and Boucheron. In a time when the emphasis was on the quantity of precious stones in a jewellery piece, Lalique, who was fascinated with the natural world, created nature-inspired pieces depicting animals and the female form. In 1888, he registered his "RL" stamp and engraved the unique pieces created in his workshop with these letters.

    In the next few years, Lalique had started experimenting with glassware, having already used enamel and glass with gold and precious stones in his jewellery designs. In 1907, Lalique met the famous perfumer François Coty, and created ornate perfume bottles for his early brands such as L'Effleur and Ambre Antique, and developed a technique that allowed mass production of glass bottles. By 1921, Lalique had fully devoted himself to glassmaking, and his efforts took him to Alsace in eastern France, which had a strong and historic glassmaking tradition. Here he established the Verrerie d'Alsace glassworks factory at Wingen-sur-Moder in Alsace.

    After Lalique's death in 1945, his son Marc took over and the company transitioned from producing its famous Lalique glass to crystal. It was named Cristallerie Lalique in 1962, and is now the world's only Lalique factory.
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17
-'ANNECY' CRYSTAL VASE BY RENÉ LALIQUE
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  • 'ANNECY' CRYSTAL VASE BY RENÉ LALIQUE
  • France, Designed by René Lalique, 1935
    Signed 'R.LALIQUE/FRANCE' (on the base)...
  • "Glass is a marvellous material."- René Lalique, 1925

    Lalique is a French glassware design house founded by artist, master ceramist and jewellery designer René Lalique. One of the best-known designers of the Art Nouveau period, Lalique's glass designs often included dancing nymphs, fish, dragonflies, and foliage, typical of this period. His unique style played with the contrast between clear and frosted glass, sometimes embellished with a patina, enamel or stained glass.

    Before he started his own business in 1887, Lalique designed jewellery for prestigious houses such as Cartier and Boucheron. In a time when the emphasis was on the quantity of precious stones in a jewellery piece, Lalique, who was fascinated with the natural world, created nature-inspired pieces depicting animals and the female form. In 1888, he registered his "RL" stamp and engraved the unique pieces created in his workshop with these letters.

    In the next few years, Lalique had started experimenting with glassware, having already used enamel and glass with gold and precious stones in his jewellery designs. In 1907, Lalique met the famous perfumer François Coty, and created ornate perfume bottles for his early brands such as L'Effleur and Ambre Antique, and developed a technique that allowed mass production of glass bottles. By 1921, Lalique had fully devoted himself to glassmaking, and his efforts took him to Alsace in eastern France, which had a strong and historic glassmaking tradition. Here he established the Verrerie d'Alsace glassworks factory at Wingen-sur-Moder in Alsace.

    After Lalique's death in 1945, his son Marc took over and the company transitioned from producing its famous Lalique glass to crystal. It was named Cristallerie Lalique in 1962, and is now the world's only Lalique factory.
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18
-'BAGATELLE' CRYSTAL VASE BY LALIQUE
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  • 'BAGATELLE' CRYSTAL VASE BY LALIQUE
  • France, Designed by René Lalique, 1939
    Engraved 'Lalique France' (on the base)...
  • "Glass is a marvellous material."- René Lalique, 1925

    Lalique is a French glassware design house founded by artist, master ceramist and jewellery designer René Lalique. One of the best-known designers of the Art Nouveau period, Lalique's glass designs often included dancing nymphs, fish, dragonflies, and foliage, typical of this period. His unique style played with the contrast between clear and frosted glass, sometimes embellished with a patina, enamel or stained glass.

    Before he started his own business in 1887, Lalique designed jewellery for prestigious houses such as Cartier and Boucheron. In a time when the emphasis was on the quantity of precious stones in a jewellery piece, Lalique, who was fascinated with the natural world, created nature-inspired pieces depicting animals and the female form. In 1888, he registered his "RL" stamp and engraved the unique pieces created in his workshop with these letters.

    In the next few years, Lalique had started experimenting with glassware, having already used enamel and glass with gold and precious stones in his jewellery designs. In 1907, Lalique met the famous perfumer François Coty, and created ornate perfume bottles for his early brands such as L'Effleur and Ambre Antique, and developed a technique that allowed mass production of glass bottles. By 1921, Lalique had fully devoted himself to glassmaking, and his efforts took him to Alsace in eastern France, which had a strong and historic glassmaking tradition. Here he established the Verrerie d'Alsace glassworks factory at Wingen-sur-Moder in Alsace.

    After Lalique's death in 1945, his son Marc took over and the company transitioned from producing its famous Lalique glass to crystal. It was named Cristallerie Lalique in 1962, and is now the world's only Lalique factory.
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19
-PAIR OF CRYSTAL AND PATINATED BRONZE EWERS BY LALIQUE
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  • PAIR OF CRYSTAL AND PATINATED BRONZE EWERS BY LALIQUE
  • France, 20th Century
    Engraved 'Lalique France' (centre)
    a) 20.5 in (52.3 cm) ...
  • "Glass is a marvellous material."- René Lalique, 1925

    Lalique is a French glassware design house founded by artist, master ceramist and jewellery designer René Lalique. One of the best-known designers of the Art Nouveau period, Lalique's glass designs often included dancing nymphs, fish, dragonflies, and foliage, typical of this period. His unique style played with the contrast between clear and frosted glass, sometimes embellished with a patina, enamel or stained glass.

    Before he started his own business in 1887, Lalique designed jewellery for prestigious houses such as Cartier and Boucheron. In a time when the emphasis was on the quantity of precious stones in a jewellery piece, Lalique, who was fascinated with the natural world, created nature-inspired pieces depicting animals and the female form. In 1888, he registered his "RL" stamp and engraved the unique pieces created in his workshop with these letters.

    In the next few years, Lalique had started experimenting with glassware, having already used enamel and glass with gold and precious stones in his jewellery designs. In 1907, Lalique met the famous perfumer François Coty, and created ornate perfume bottles for his early brands such as L'Effleur and Ambre Antique, and developed a technique that allowed mass production of glass bottles. By 1921, Lalique had fully devoted himself to glassmaking, and his efforts took him to Alsace in eastern France, which had a strong and historic glassmaking tradition. Here he established the Verrerie d'Alsace glassworks factory at Wingen-sur-Moder in Alsace.

    After Lalique's death in 1945, his son Marc took over and the company transitioned from producing its famous Lalique glass to crystal. It was named Cristallerie Lalique in 1962, and is now the world's only Lalique factory.
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20
-SILVER TANKARD BY OOMERSI MAWJI & CO.
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  • SILVER TANKARD BY OOMERSI MAWJI & CO.
  • Gujarat, 1918
    Engraved 'G.M.B/FEBRUARY 23RD/1918' and signed 'OM' (on the...
  • An early twentieth century silver tankard with a leaf-capped scroll handle and a dense foliage pattern across the body.

    Oomersi Mawji was the son of a cobbler and rose to become court silversmith to the Maharaos of Kutch, and the Maharajas of Baroda, two of the most important royal courts in princely India. The firm of Oomersi Mawji & Sons ceased operations in the 1930s. O.M. silver, as it has come to be known among collectors, has an endearing value as much for its artistry as for the history of Indian craftsmanship associated with its manufacture. Objects manufactured by the workshops of Oomersi Mawji can be seen at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Musee Guimet in Paris and Harvard University's Arthur M. Sackler Museum, and at most major museums all over the world.

    Artisans in the Bhuj region of Kutch enjoyed patronage from a lineage of rulers, including the Gaekwads and the Maharaos. The Maharao of Kutch, Khengarji III, played a particularly significant role in helping Kutch silversmithsgain international recognition by ensuring that they regularly attended regional and international silver exhibitions to display and popularise their creations.
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