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1
-Vishnu with Anantha
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  • Vishnu with Anantha
  • Beige Granite
    8th Century

    Pallava Dynasty
    Tamil Nadu
    ...
  • Vishnu is seen in an unusual form here, with Anantha, his five-headed serpent forming a canopy above his head.

    Four-armed Vishnu is portrayed holding his attributes the 'shankha' and 'chakra' in his upper left and right hands respectively. The attributes rest above the index and middle fingers. Vishnu's lower right hand is in the 'abhaya mudra' and his lower left palm rests on the seat. His left foot is raised on the seat, close to his body, and the right foot is pendant. Vishnu's body is erect. The arms and the lower limbs are rounded. The face of the deity is serene, in keeping with his role of protector.

    While his upper body is bare and bejeweled, his lower vestment, which is of a thin fabric, is wonderfully draped around his legs, falling in fine folds, reaching a little above his ankles. This vestment is held around his waist by a narrow, ornate belt. The face and figure of this lovely Pallava sculpture is further highlighted by the beautiful, elongated crown on the head and the five heads of Anantha or Sheshanaga, protecting the deity. A single large studded necklace adorns his neck. Typical Pallava styled ear-rings reach down on to his shoulders, and his amulets and bracelets are also typical of the school.

    Anantha or Sesha is a creature of great significance in Vaishnava worship. According to the Bhagvat Purana he is an avatar of Narayana. One of his incarnations, Patanjali, compiled the yoga sutras. Anantha often accompanied his master during his incarnations. When Vishnu took birth as Rama Anantha was born as Laxmana. When he took the incarnation of Krishna, Anantha took the avatar of Balarama. Thus the significance of Anantha is beyond words.

    The stone used to make this sculpture is beige granite, a colour seen in certain Pallava pockets. One unusual feature of this sculpture is the condition and clarity of the piece. Usually pieces of this period tend to be highly weathered with hardly any features visible. In this case that is not so. This piece not only has good clarity, but also a lovely texture. It is most likely to have originated from the Tiruchirapalli area. It can be seen that this sculpture is in high relief, which adds to its grace.
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2
-Seated Ganesha
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  • Seated Ganesha
  • Granite
    8th Century

    Pallava Period
    Andhra Pradesh
    ...
  • This granite sculpture of Ganesha is a very unusual piece. Vinayaka is shown seated with a prabha behind him. Although it is a four-armed traditional form of the deity, there are certain outstanding features. Ganesha's eyes are protruding, which gives the deity a powerful look. The shoulders are broad and well rounded. His ears are small, yet prominent. The head is broad and so is his trunk. His vahana, the rat, can faintly be seen beneath his right foot.

    He is shown holding his attributes in his upper two hands, a ball of sweets is in his lower left hand, and his broken tusk in his lower right hand. His crown is small in size and a part of his forehead bulges out of the crown. The Yajnopavita or caste thread is very prominent and runs from the left shoulder to the right waist, almost seeming like a belt. A band is also seen above his rotund belly. Other ornamentation is minimal. The sculpture originates from Andhra Pradesh and is an unusual specimen due to its age, stylization and region of origin.
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$12,500
Rs 6,50,000




3
-Seated Devi
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  • Seated Devi
  • Stone
    10th Century

    Andhra Pradesh

    Height: 23 in (59 cm)
  • One of the Saptamatrikas (seven holy mothers) is seen here seated in royal ease. She is holding a 'khadaga' or large knife in her lower right hand, which rests on her raised right knee, and a shallow cup in her lower left hand, which rests on her thigh. In her upper hands she would have held the 'vajra' and 'shakti'.

    The Devi has a well modeled body, broad at the shoulders and narrow at the waist. She has a rounded face with perfectly shaped lips and nose. Her limbs are long, well rounded and shapely. Her upper body is bare, while her lower vestment is beautifully draped around her legs in fine folds. Part of the large halo that surrounded her head is also visible. The Devi is crowned, and wears large earrings, armbands and wristbands. Her necklace is thick, multi-layered and prominent. Her hair is seen spread out behind her head like the flames of a fire. There is a strong determination in her appearance as she sits straight-backed on a pedestal.

    The subject can be identified by the presence of a small elephant at the lower left, denoting that she is Indrani, the female aspect of Indra. This is a very rare and unusual piece in many respects. The manner in which a thick drape spreads over the shoulders is unusual. Also noteworthy is the design of the bracelets and the flaming hair. These features coupled with the blackish colour of the stone indicate that the piece is a rare creation that originates from Andhra Pradesh.
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$12,500
Rs 6,50,000




4
-Jina Parsvanatha
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  • Jina Parsvanatha
  • Greenish Schist
    11th Century

    Hoysala Dynasty
    Karnataka
    ...
  • Parsavanatha is the twenty-third Jaina Tirthankara, born in Varanasi. Tirthankaras are spiritual conquerors; they were guides or ford-makers. This sculpture is a powerful example, depicting Parsavanatha standing in the Kayotasarga posture. He is bereft of clothes, and stands on the coiled tail of the serpent. His dark-hued body along with the sinuous multi-hooded serpent, his symbol offering protection over his head, gives this sculpture a strong aura. The body of the serpent is coiled and can be partially seen behind that of the Jina.

    This sculpture has a very masculine, well-modeled and strong body. The shoulders are broad, the chest is thrust out and the waist is slim. His long arms hang by the sides of his powerful body. His face is rounded and serene, and his lips are curved in a faint smile denoting inner peace.

    Most Jain and Buddhist sculptures of this early period are usually in very poor condition with the facial expressions tending to get completely worn off over time. This sculpture not only has the face and features intact, but is also a radiant and typical example. The whole composition has a very serene and peaceful aura.
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5
-Vishnu
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  • Vishnu
  • Grey Schist
    11th Century

    Pala Dynasty

    Height: 18.5 in...
  • The word Pala means protector in Sanskrit. Under the rule of the Pala kings significant developments took place in the field of arts in the states of Bihar and Bengal.

    This standing Pala sculpture of Vishnu depicts him in a four-handed form. He is shown as the cosmic monarch. His upper left hand holds the discus as his upper right hand bears the mace. His lower left hand would have held the conch. His lower right hand bears a lovely lotus flower. He stands on a double lotus pedestal. He is flanked on his left by Saraswati and on his right by Laxmi. Saraswati holds her musical instrument, the veena while Laxmi holds a flywhisk. His facial features are clear and his posture emits confidence. Above Vishnu on either side, two apsaras can be seen. Two attendants and floral motifs occupy the lower part of the sculpture. Vishnu's fingers are delicately executed and the face exhibits a radiant smile. His emblem the Srivatsa is prominently placed on his chest.

    The work is a typical example of the school. In the centuries after, the school had a significant impact on the arts of Nepal, Tibet and Southeast Asia.
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6
-Lion
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  • Lion
  • Buff Sandstone
    Late 11th Century

    Madhya Pradesh

    Height: 22...
  • Representations of lions have been seen for centuries in the Central Indian region. Apart from Kushan lions, which were stylistically very different, portrayals such as this one began from the 7th century onwards. Such earlier ones had certain traits and features that set them apart. All of them would have once formed part of old architecture, and would have mostly been placed as a pair to give the feeling of guardian beasts.

    Most such sculptures tend to be either just heads or the upper torso, if not full figures in a highly mutilated form. It is rare to find a large complete sculpture in such a good condition with such an imposing form.

    The beast is seen standing at attention on its hind legs. The tail is long and thrown up in a curl. The face is expressive with the mouth wide open in a realistic manner. The upper torso is majestic in appearance, and the paws are carved in a very realistic manner with great detailing. The motifs seen on the body are typical of the period. The entire look imparted is that of a very powerful ferocious creature.

    Lionel figures of this scale, completeness, condition and quality are very rare to come by. They would have once occupied a prominent spot in ancient architecture in Central India.
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$5,769
Rs 3,00,000




7
-Female Torso
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  • Female Torso
  • Granite
    12th Century

    Chola Dynasty
    Tamil Nadu

    Height:...
  • The powerful Chola Dynasty ruled Tamil Nadu from the 10th to the 13th century A.D. The Empire was magnificent and spread from the islands of the Maldives up to the banks of the Godavari in Andhra Pradesh. Apart from being great conquerors, the Chola kings were also dedicated patrons of the arts and had outstanding aesthetic sensibilities. Under their rule, some of the most exceptional sculptures in metal and stone were created. Raja Raja Chola and his son Rajendra Chola also built spectacular temples. The proportion, posture, expression and rhythm of sculptures of this period still stand unrivalled. Today collectors the world over realize the rarity of sculptures of this period, and are always looking to acquire the few available, surviving examples which are reminiscent of this great ancient civilization.

    This beautiful lady's torso is a fine example of the skilled craftsmanship that prevailed in the Chola kingdom. The figure is four handed and stands in the samabhanga posture. In this pose, both legs are held straight. The fact that the sculpture has stood witness to several centuries is visible in the condition of the attributes; the head and hands are also lost. However, the beauty that remains is beyond compare. The manner in which the body shape is contoured is spectacular. A large choker necklace decorates the neck. The breasts are small and firm and the waist is slim. The hips are shown full and rounded. A yajnopavita or sacred thread flows down artistically over the body. The waist ornament has great detailing and the lower garment is a thin fabric that clings to the body, taking the shape of the knee, with its creases flowing out symmetrically. The anklets and toe rings are also carved in great detail. One cannot fail to imagine what kind of a beauty this figure would have been in full.

    The finest of torsos like this one have long excited the sensibilities of passionate collectors with great taste. The full three-dimensional body and fine detailing point out that this piece must have been the work of one of the master carvers of the Chola regime. Going by South Indian iconography, after studying the posture and hands we can conclude that the subject would most likely have been Durga, one of the most important Devis or goddesses in Hindu mythology.
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8
-Ganesha
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  • Ganesha
  • Buff Sandstone
    13th Century

    Madhya Pradesh

    Height: 18 in...
  • Ganesha, known as the remover of all obstacles, is seen here seated in his usual four-handed form. He is the son of Shiva and Parvati, and perhaps the most widely worshipped of all Hindu Gods.

    In this buff-sandstone sculpture, he holds his attributes in his upper hands. The upper right hand holds an axe, and the upper left hand holds a lotus bud. His lower left hand holds scriptures, denoting his wisdom. It is said that he had assisted the great sage Vyasa in writing the Mahabharata. His lower right arm rests on his knee and holds a bowl of his favorite sweets, the 'modak'. The long trunk of this food loving deity extends to the bowl to fetch a morsel of the sweet. Several necklaces adorn his neck, and large anklets decorate his feet. A large crown rests on his head.

    The sculpture is large and complete. The fact that the attributes are intact and the beige colour add to the visual impact of this sculpture.
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9
-An Elephant
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  • An Elephant
  • Granite
    15th Century

    Tamil Nadu

    Height: 17.5 in (45 cm)
  • This dignified looking sculpture of an elephant bears intricate carvings on its back, sides and head. Decorative rings are also seen around its legs. The beast stands on its own base of stone, with its trunk falling straight towards the base and then curling inward. Attentive looking ears, well defined eyes, and the posture indicating motion accentuate the beauty of this sculpture.

    In Indian mythology as well as history this peaceful animal has enjoyed pride of place. The elephant or 'gaja' has been tamed and used as a mode of transportation since ancient times, as well as for other peaceful and martial purposes. Gods, kings and people of status have all appropriated elephants as their vehicles, as they are symbolic of auspiciousness, abundance, strength, wisdom and royalty among other positive attributes. According to Hindu legend, Airavata was the first elephant, a pure white animal with four tusks and seven trunks who served as the 'vahana' or vehicle of the God of War and Thunderstorms, Indra. In ancient sculpture, one frequently sees rows of elephants placed in various parts of external architecture.
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10
-An Ornate Prabha
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  • An Ornate Prabha
  • Bronze
    16th Century

    Kerala

    Height: 17.5 in (45cm)
  • Some of the finest bronze cast prabhas or arches for devotional figures come from the state of Kerala. This sculpted bronze Prabha from Kerala has exquisite floral work on it with the finest of details. The net-like floral work is multi-tiered, and at one place there are two open-mouthed 'makaras' or mythical water beasts. The uniformity of the pattern is the most commendable feature of this prabha. It is likely that this splendid arch was crafted for a figure of Lord Rama, which would have been once placed in the centre.

    The arch ends behind two seated figures: To the left is Lakshman, bare-bodied, crowned and holding a bow and arrow in his hands. He has a powerful look on his face, and is seated in a regal posture. The beautiful figure to the right is that of Sita, the consort of Rama. She too is crowned, richly bejeweled and holds objects in her hands. Both the figures have been cast in such a manner that the ends of the arch fit perfectly behind each of them.

    This artefact with traditional adornments is very graceful, and is an admirable bronze arch from the sixteenth century.
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11
-Lord Vishnu
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  • Lord Vishnu
  • Granite
    17th Century

    Nayak Dynasty
    Madurai, Tamil Nadu
    ...
  • Vishnu, one of the three principal deities of the Hindu triad, is revered widely as the God of protection. His consorts are Goddess Lakshmi, who is revered for material wealth and prosperity, and Bhudevi, who is worshipped as Mother Earth. Here, in this beautifully carved figure of stone, he is depicted in a graceful standing posture, with a very powerful and assertive look.

    He is portrayed here with four arms. In his upper two hands he would have held his attributes, a chakra and a conch, while his lower left hand is seen resting lightly on his hip. In some sculptures, this deity is seen holding a mace or a 'gada' which rests on the base on which he stands. His lower right hand is seen in the 'abhaya mudra' or the 'fear not' position, a sign of his benevolence and kindness towards his devotees.

    Here Vishnu is portrayed wearing an elongated crown. His upper body, which is bare, is adorned in jewelry. He also wears armbands, wristbands, anklets and an ornate waistband. His lower vestment, which is a dhoti, falls almost up to his ankles in fine folds. His eyes are large with arched eyebrows, portraying his benevolence, and he has a faint smile. The entire sculpture has very realistic modeling. Fine features like the facial muscles can be seen, and the stomach has a slight bulge due to the tight waist band.

    The work has great presence with the simple ornamentation adding to the charm.
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12
-Durga on a Lion
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  • Durga on a Lion
  • Wood
    20th Century

    Tamil Nadu

    Height: 21.5 in (54.6 cms)
  • Goddess Durga is one of the most popular and powerful manifestations of Parvati, the consort of Lord Shiva. It is said that at one time the 'asuras' or demons were wreaking havoc and misery in the celestial world of the Gods. One of them, Mahishasura, was extremely powerful and could change his form at will, thus escaping the Gods. He had received a boon that no man or mortal could kill him. The Gods therefore performed a religious ritual and created Goddess Durga, a extremely powerful goddess of paramount beauty with ten arms, who's 'vahana' or vehicle is a lion. Each one of the Gods and Goddesses gave her one of their choicest weapons to destroy Mahishasura.

    Goddess Durga chased Mahishasura over the three worlds, which shook in a terrible fight that ensued over days. To escape notice, the 'asura' finally assumed the form of a buffalo. However, Durga immediately saw through this disguise and killed the buffalo with the 'trishula' or trident given to her by Shiva, thus killing Mahisasura. Durga is therefore also called 'Mahisasuramardini'.

    This exquisite woodcarving portrays goddess Durga seated on the back of a lion with a trident in her raised hand. Durga is crowned and bejeweled. She looks all-powerful, and the lion looks menacing with large bulbous eyes, a thick mane and a powerful muscular body. This carving is vibrant and full of life. Multi-armed Goddess Durga seems to be poised to attack Mahishasura. This is quite a rare subject on wood and has been very well executed by a master artisan.
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13
-Krishna with his Consorts
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  • Krishna with his Consorts
  • Wood
    20th Century

    Tamil Nadu

    Height: 18.5 in (46 cm)
  • This exquisitely carved wooden fragment originates from Tamil Nadu and depicts Krishna with his consorts. Here, he is seen bare-bodied with an ample belly, bejeweled and seated majestically on the coils of the multi-hooded serpent Sesha. The hood of the serpent above his head offers protection. He is flanked by his consorts Satyabhama and Rukmini, to his left and right respectively.

    He holds a ball of butter in his right hand and the tasseled end of his angavastra in his left hand. His body is adorned with large necklaces, long earrings, wristbands and anklets. His face bears a radiant smile.

    Both Satyabhama and Rukmini are standing on pedestals. They are clad in saris and blouses. The folds of the saris flow down beautifully. Both are shown with eager faces. Rukmini, who is to the right of Krishna, bears a bird on her hand.
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14
-Wooden Carved Panel
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  • Wooden Carved Panel
  • Wood
    20th Century

    Kerala

    Length: 79 in (198 cm)
  • This is an exquisitely carved wooden panel from Kerala. It is part of a running frieze that depicts a very unique subject. A barren (childless) lady, probably a queen, along with her husband takes advice from a learned sage who helps them by preparing a potent medicine and offers it to the lady. The lady, after gratefully accepting and consuming the potion, begets a child.

    The carving on this panel being a running narrative makes it all the more unique and interesting, as a progressive picture enfolds before us. A figure showed repeatedly gives a clear understanding of the subject.

    Beginning from the left side of this panel, the first four figures are those of the old, wise, bearded sage. He is shown sitting with a pestle and preparing the herbal potion and thereafter giving it to the lady in her hand. The eighth figure is her husband who folds his hands in veneration as he is grateful to the sage. The lady consumes the medicine and thereafter she is portrayed nine times, each successive figure showing her with a larger belly, beautifully ending with a full-term pregnancy. Thereafter, she is shown in a semi-reclining position as she goes into labour. Helped by a mid-wife, she gives birth to a child.

    Interestingly, her husband bows before her as a gesture of his gratefulness to her for having borne him a child to be his heir. This gesture of the man prompts us to assume that he was a king, in need of an heir. However, the specific entities cannot be identified. The panel ends with the mid-wife bathing the child in warm water brought in pots, and finally the mother holding the baby.

    It is a wonderful narrative depicting motherhood and the joys that go with it. Besides, it was a painstaking job for a clever artisan to portray the lady nine times as she goes into pregnancy, each time with a more prominent belly. The artisan has also maintained perfect proportions of each figure within a limited space, and has done a commendable job of creating several figures within this length of wood.
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15
-Malabar Box
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  • Malabar Box
  • Wood and brass
    20th Century

    Kerala

    Height: 8.5 in (22 cm)
  • This wooden box with brass fittings is popularly known as a 'dowry box', and comes from the Malabar region of South India. Such boxes were given to a bride by her parents on the occasion of her wedding, containing jewellery, money and other valuables. The shape of the box resembles a house, and therefore is very symbolic of the new home that the bride will be going to. The brass work on the front and back of the lid of this box is shaped artistically, and there is a decorative latch.

    These boxes are crafted from strong wood, generally cut into the required shapes and then put together. However, this particular example is rather special since the box and the lid have been carved from a single block of rosewood, which requires precision work. The brass work is of excellent quality and is hand beaten. The box is old and light in weight, unlike more recent reproductions. Such boxes were always considered prized possessions by their owners.
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16
-Urali
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  • Urali
  • Bronze
    20th Century

    Kerala

    Height: 6.5 in (17 cm)...
  • This vessel is called an 'Urali' in the local parlance of Kerala, South India. The casting is perfect, and the gauge of the metal is very thick as compared to recent reproductions. The artistic work is superior, and the vessel extremely strong.

    These vessels were used in the large temples of Southern India for the preparation of sweet dishes, which were offered to the presiding deity of the temple and thereafter distributed to the devotees. They had to be placed on large logs of cindering wood when cooking, and had to be of a particular thickness to withstand the heat. They were also used for the preparation of ayurvedic medicines.

    However, these vessels are slowly becoming a thing of the past as such fine casting and excellent workmanship are rarely seen any more.
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17
-The Durbar of Rama
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  • The Durbar of Rama
  • Mysore Painting
    20th Century

    Karnataka

    36.5 x 27 in (91.25...
  • Mysore painting is an important form of classical South Indian painting that originated in the royal state of Mysore. These paintings are known for their elegance, light and sober colours, and attention to detail. Hindu deities have generally been the main subjects of Mysore paintings, as also scenes from Hindu mythology. Finely done Mysore paintings are rare and highly sought after.

    The process of making a Mysore painting involves many stages. First, drawing the preliminary sketch of the image on the base, which consists of cartridge paper pasted on a wooden sheet. Gold paint is then profusely applied on certain areas, and the rest of the work is finally filled with colour.

    This large and exquisite Mysore painting depicts Rama, the seventh incarnation of Lord Vishnu, seated on his regal throne with his consort Sita. They are accompanied by Rama's brother Lakshmana and his ardent devotee the mighty Hanuman. Rama is shown seated in a relaxed posture, with his right arm resting on his knee. His vestments are all gold, bordered with fine work. Rama and Sita are wearing crowns and heavy jewellery of the type worn by Gods and Goddesses. Hanuman is bare-chested and wears a short, tight lower garment. His expression and features are noteworthy. Lakshmana is crowned too, however most of his body is behind the throne. His face is beaming with a suppressed pleasure. The throne is ornate with a lot of gold work. One needs to observe this painting closely to notice the fine details and designs.

    The excellent colour tone, expressions and composition, and the large scale of this work coupled with its high quality make it an important painting.
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18
-Princess & Companion
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  • Princess & Companion

  • Early 18th Century

    Mughal School

    Size: 7 x 5 in (17.8 x...
  • This well finished Mughal painting is that of a princess and her companion. The two figures are seen standing at an open palace window.

    The beautiful princess is seen holding a small glass of wine, which she seems to be passing on to her companion, who stands next to her. The princess has one hand around her companion's shoulder, indicating a closeness between the two women. The princess wears a short, tight long-sleeved blouse and a fawn coloured embroidered skirt with a fine veil over her head. Her simple jewellery consists of a pearl necklace, earrings and bangles. She has beautiful but thoughtful eyes, thick eyebrows, long lustrous hair and a flawless complexion. Her companion wears a long-sleeved jama with fine embroidered flowers that can be seen through the veil she covers herself with. She also wears pearl jewellery with a prominent nose ring and a 'tikli' or head decoration. Their hands are henna-dyed. The quality of the work and finish are remarkable. The hand painted work looks like a photograph. It is quite obviously the hand of a well trained artist of the great Mughal court.
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19
-Lady Awaits Lover
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  • Lady Awaits Lover

  • Leaf from a Ragamala Set

    Early 18th Century

    Amer School,...
  • Ragamala literally translates as 'garland of musical notes'. Ragamala paintings synthesize music, poetry and painting. A Raga is a combination of notes. These notes are said to create a mood depending on their combination. Therefore there exist different seasons, occasions and times for singing these ragas. Painters in medieval times made pictorial translations for these notes. These resulted in Ragamala Paintings.

    This fine Ragamala painting is from the Amer School and represents Gauri Ragini, an evening raga associated with autumn and a contemplative mood. A pretty looking dusky lady, wearing a short tight choli and a long golden skirt, with an odhna covering her head, is seen seated on a carpet with her head bent low, awaiting her lover. She is longingly looking at a bed with a wonderful canopy. The lady has expressive eyes, a sharp nose and small lips. Her jewellery consists of gold and pearl necklaces, earrings, armbands, anklets and bangles. She holds a twig of leaves in her right hand. The house is well decorated; there are niches on the wall, holding long-necked bottles, and the floor has a beautiful green carpet with a red border. A bed is placed with two pillows on it. The doorway is adorned with a lovely embroidered curtain that has been rolled and tied. The terrace wall is delicately painted. Thickly foliated trees can be seen beyond the boundary wall. The four-post bed with a purple and gold canopy in the courtyard has a pillow kept in one corner. A focal point of this painting is the copious use of gold paint on the skirt of the lady, the thick bolster against which she rests, the border of the curtain within the house as well as on the curtain hanging on the doorway to the entrance to the house. A thick border around the canopy is also gold painted. There is a lovely red with green border sun-shade above the entrance to the house.

    There are various pictorial representations of Gauri Ragini. This unusual one shows the lover in waiting dressing her hair with flowers from a mango tree. One can see a branch of the tree in her hand with leaves and fruits. The bed next to her has been decorated with petals. She awaits the arrival of her lover. The four line script on the top describes the subject. It is very rare to find paintings of this quality and period in such mint condition.
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20
-Bhakti Ratnavali Folio
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  • Bhakti Ratnavali Folio

  • Ro Patra 157

    c. 1760

    Mewar School, Rajasthan
    ...
  • This brilliant yet serene painting shows Yudhisthira, the eldest son of king Pandu of the Pandava clan, seated before Vidhura, a scholar and advisor, who holds prayer beads. They are to the left top, shown seated on a white prayer-rug, imparting words of wisdom on meditation. Vidhura tells Yudhisthira: "He who sits alone and worships the Lord only knows what is a good deed and what is Dharma."

    Below them a figure is shown seated on a rug with prayer beads in his hand. He is deeply engrossed in meditation. Blue-hued Lord Vishnu is seated on a white rug, wearing a yellow dhoti. He is crowned and he holds his attributes - the 'shankha', ' chakra', ' gada' and ' padma' - in his four hands. An entity seated on a white rug as well as Yudhishthira who appears again at the lower right corner, are seen giving alms to young boys.

    Except Yudhishthira, who is in fine clothing, wearing headgear, all the other figures are bare-bodied, wearing dhotis with their hair tied up behind their head. The artist has provided a rich green background to this painting, with flowers strewn around.

    Paintings from this Mewar series are vibrant and striking. The horizontal format, the widely spaced figures, plain background, fine outlining and mint condition make this a fine work.

    Other examples from this famous series are in the collection of the National Museum, New Delhi, as well as the Sarabhai Collection.
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